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French Health Care

2. Health Insurance Cover in France

  1. S1 Form Certificates of Entitlement
  2. Health Cover for Self-Employed
  3. Health Cover for Cross Border Workers
  4. Health Cover for Retired Persons
  5. Health Cover for Early Retirees
  6. European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)
  7. Travelling Abroad from France

2.4. S1 Health Cover for Retired Persons

For the purposes of this section we define a 'retired person' as someone of the age of retirement of their country of origin, who exercises no professional activity, and who is in receipt of a State Pension from their home EEA country.

We also include in this category those persons under the age of retirement, but in receipt of long term incapacity benefit.

If you propose to run a business in France, then you will not be eligible for an S1, even though of retirement age, as you will be insured through your business.

If you are relocating from within the EEA and you are retired and in receipt of a state pension, or you suffer from long term incapacity then, in order to register with the French health system, you will need to bring with you Form S1 certificate of entitlement from the social security authority in your home country.

This form should be presented to your local French health authority, the Caisse Primaire d’Assurance Maladie.

Those from the UK should contact the International Pension Centre, Tyneview Park, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE98 1BA, United Kingdom.

As a retired person, if you have an S1 you will continue to benefit indefinitely from free health insurance cover in France.

However, the use of the S1 does not mean you will get free health care in France. It simply means that you will not need to pay into the French social security system or to take out private health insurance in order to obtain health cover,

The use of the S1 also means that you are not formally affiliated to the French health system, which means that you get exemption from the payment of social charges on your pension income. In effect, your health cover is being paid for through reciprocal arrangements in place within Europe; only those actually affiliated to the French health system pay these charges on their pension.

As the French health system only covers a percentage of basic health charges, ranging from 35% at the bottom end to 100% for major illnesses, if you wish to ensure all your costs are met you will need to take out voluntary ('top up') health insurance.

Even then, you will be responsible for paying some residual costs that are not picked up by either the social security or most voluntary health insurance systems.

So do not assume an S1 picks up all your health costs; it does not.

2.4.1 Permanent Incapacity

The rules governing entitlement to UK long term incapacity benefit have changed in recent years, with the abolition of Incapacity Benefit and it's replacement by 'Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)'.

The benefit is exportable to France, although claimants are required to demonstrate a satisfactory national insurance record, and all claimants in France will be required to go through a periodic 'Work Capability Assessment' by a French doctor.

A person on incapacity benefit is likely to be entitled to receive full reimbursement of all the medical costs relating to their condition, provided it is classified as a Affection de Longue Durée – (ALD) by the medical authorities.

Similarly, anyone who suffers from a long-term or major illness is likely to find that 100% of costs in relation to the treatment of this illness are covered by the French social security system, provided it is also on the list of affections de longue durée – (ALD).

2.4.2 'Dependent' Spouses

A 'dependent' younger spouse of someone reaching State retirement age is also granted cover under an S1.

The definition of just what is regarded as being 'dependent' includes all those in a married relationship or in a civil partnership. Thus, even though your spouse may have an independent source of income, they would be admitted as a dependent.

Only in the case of those not married, or in a civil partnership, would it normally be necessary to prove financial dependency.

The decision as to who is dependent is not made by the French authorities, but by your country of origin. Some local health authorities in France have been known to contest dependency status, but the cases have been rare, and generally not upheld.

In the event that the holder of an S1 dies before their 'dependent' younger spouse reaches retirement age, then the surviving partner will continue to retain health cover through the S1 for 12 months.

However, use of this arrangement may not be necessary, as you would normally be granted automatic and permanent access into the French health system through 'accident of life' provisions. You can read more about this rule at Health Cover for Early Retirees.

You would be required to pay health contributions if you are not of retirement age, but these would be related to income, and those on a low income are entitled to free cover.

On this basis, a dependent younger spouse of a retired person should always be able to obtain State health cover in France.

If one of partners to a household works or is in business in France, while the other is retired and in receipt of a State Pension, then three possible scenarios open up, with the rules a little unclear and application of the rules varied.

The first is and most likely approach is for the retired partner to obtain cover through an S1, while the other partner continues to be affiliated to the health system through their business or employment.

The second is that the local health authority accept both being insured through the S1. We consider this scenario unlikely (but not inconceivable) as the S1 is for use by retired persons living abroad in Europe.

The third is where the local health authority in France insist that both be insured through the employment or business. However, it is questionable whether the French authorities could insist on this approach. Indeed it would not be financially advantageous for them to do so, as with separate insurance for each partner they receive two insurance premiums, one paid by the social security agency of the S1 recipient and the other directly by the business owner.

If you would like to receive regular information on the health system in France, then register to receive free of charge each month our Newsletter.


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